Celebrating 50 years of collaboration: GSA Art in Architecture

GSA Art in Architecture
Celebrates 50 Years!

Public art is for the people. GSA's public art collection is a national treasure. Art in federal buildings creates a better environment for conducting government business. They offer spaces to equitably represent the diversity of America and to support the arts in communities that have federal buildings.

This year we are celebrating the 50th anniversary of GSA's Art in Architecture program. Join us as we spotlight our art and artists, special events, program history and more! And, don't forget to follow #AiA50 on social media.

Video

News

  • GSA Celebrates 50 Years of Art in Architecture

    Since 1972, GSA’s Art in Architecture (AiA) program has commissioned more than 500 artworks that are permanently installed in buildings across the country.

  • Five Women Artists Who Shaped Public Art

    Many talented women have shaped public art and broken barriers in the art field. GSA highlights five of these women artists in the GSA Fine Arts Collection.

  • Bearing Witness

    Bearing Witness was created by world-renowned artist Martin Puryear. It is a massive sculpture, standing 40 feet tall and weighing 20,000 pounds.

  • GSA Expands Diversity and Access in Public Art Program

    GSA announced updated provisions of its AiA program, to expand access to a broader array of artists and better reflect the diversity of America in public art.

History

A semi-trailer truck transports artwork titled 'Batcolumn', a101-foot-tall baseball bat shaped sculpture consisting of gray-painted steel arranged into an open latticework structure.
Claes Oldenburg's Batcolumn during transport in 1977 to the Harold Washington Social Security Center in Chicago, Illinois.

50 years… 500 artworks…

In 1963, GSA started the Fine Arts in New Federal Buildings program, a percent-for-art policy that in 1972 became the Art in Architecture program.

Since 1972, we have commissioned more than 500 large-scale, permanently installed artworks for federal buildings nationwide.

We began this year updating the program's provisions. Our goal is to expand access to a broader array of artists and better reflect the diversity of America in public art.

"As we approach the 50th anniversary of GSA's Art in Architecture program, GSA has renewed its commitment to commissioning artists of our time to create artworks for federal buildings," said GSA Public Buildings Service Commissioner Nina Albert. "By supporting neither an official style nor subject matter, Art in Architecture seeks to include artists who work in many styles and materials and come from the diverse communities of our nation. Incorporating contemporary art in our important civic spaces exemplifies how democratic societies benefit from the creative talents of individuals."

In fall of 2022, the program is launching 26 new Art in Architecture opportunities in 11 states along the northern and southern borders, funded by the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law.

Artist commissions

Artists interested in being considered for GSA Art in Architecture (AiA) commissions may join the National Artist Registry.

For each new GSA construction project, a panel of art professionals, the primary federal client representative, civic and community representatives, the project's lead design architect, and our staff meets to discuss opportunities for artists to participate in the building project.

Artists who receive GSA AiA commissions work with the project architects and others as members of a design team to ensure that the artworks are meaningfully integrated into the overall project. We initiate about five commissions each year.

This year the program is launching 26 new Art in Architecture opportunities in 11 states along the northern and southern borders, funded by the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law.

Artist Diana Moore working on her bronze-metallic sculpture titled Justice, a blindfolded head of the Greek titaness Themis.
Diana Moore sands and polishes the surface of her 1997 sculpture Justice for the U.S. Courthouse in Concord, New Hampshire.

About

A pattern of white-on-black undulating lines sweeps across a large, curved wall.
Sol LeWitt's Wall Drawing #1259: Loopy Doopy (Springfield), 2008, at the U.S. Courthouse in Springfield, Massachusetts

GSA Art in Architecture Celebrates 50 Years!

The Art in Architecture (AiA) Program oversees the commissioning of publicly scaled and permanently installed artworks for federal buildings nationwide. These artworks enhance the civic meaning of federal architecture and showcase the vibrancy of American visual arts. Together, the art and architecture of federal buildings create a lasting cultural legacy for the people of the United States.

The incorporation of contemporary art within the nation's important civic spaces celebrates the best of American culture and exemplifies how democratic societies benefit immeasurably from the unique, creative talents of individual citizens.

Social media

Follow #AiA50 on GSA Social Media

Hash tag AiA50
Last Reviewed: 2022-11-21